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wired
05-04-2006, 07:23 PM
okay, i know i talk the talk as far as trying to do my part in this world (yes, the recent politics thread is on my mind), but i also try to walk the walk as best i can. this summer, my kids and i are participating in Plant a Row for the Hungry, a nationwide program that encourages gardeners to plant a row in their garden specifically to donate to local food banks/shelters.

i plan on having at least one row dedicated to this, plus donating the surplus we don't put up from the rest of our garden. i plan on doing this regularly as we grow 3 seasons out of the year. i'm hoping to plow a small(ish) plot next year that is completely dedicated to this that will be my kids' responsibility. they want their own gardens but won't eat what they grow, so this will be a way for them to garden and feel like they are helping someone, too.

anyway, if you grow a garden or have just thought about it, this is a good reason to decide to do so.

http://www.gardenwriters.org/Par/index.html


According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one in ten households in the United States experiences hunger or the risk of hunger. Many frequently skip meals or eat too little, sometimes going without food for an entire day. Approximately 25 million people, including 9.9 million children, have substandard diets or must resort to seeking emergency food because they cannot always afford the food they need. In the past year, the demand for hunger assistance has increased by 40%, and research shows that hundreds of hungry children and adults are turned away from food banks each year because of lack of resources. (More hunger statistics.)


The purpose of PAR is to create and sustain a grassroots program whereby garden writers utilize their media position with local newspapers, magazines and radio/TV programs to encourage their readers/listeners to donate their surplus garden produce to local food banks, soup kitchens and service organizations to help feed America’s hungry.


PAR’s success hinges on its people-helping-people approach. The concept is simple. There are over 70 million gardeners in the U.S. alone, many of which plant vegetables and harvest more than they can consume. If every gardener plants one extra row of vegetables and donates their surplus to local food banks and soup kitchens, a significant impact can be made on reducing hunger. Food agencies will have access to fresh produce, funds earmarked for produce can be redirected to other needed items and the hungry of America will have more and better food than is presently available.

PAR’s role is to provide focus, direction and support to volunteer committees who execute the programs at the local level. We help gather the human resources necessary to form a nucleus for a local committee. Then we provide training and direction to enable the committee to reach out into the community. Finally, we assist in coordinating the local food collection systems and monitor the volume of donations being conveyed to the soup kitchens and food banks. PAR is proving that every individual can make a difference in his/her community. (Last year, PAR had over 600 volunteer committees with an average of 45 people involved in each program totaling 27,000 volunteers!)



you can find a Plant a Row campaign in your area by contacting:

Program Administrator
Carol Ledbetter

E-mail: par@gwaa.org

onesuiteworld
05-04-2006, 07:25 PM
We need more Carries in this world.

dmdbmb
05-04-2006, 07:27 PM
This is pretty cool stuff. We don't grow a whole lot down here but it'd be worth a shot. I really wish we could grow a decent tomato but the heat down here just seems to rott em all. Anywho, I'm gonna see what I can come up with....I could always grow Oranges:biggrin:

Edit: she has a cool last name :thumbsup:

wired
05-04-2006, 07:30 PM
Anywho, I'm gonna see what I can come up with....I could always grow Oranges:biggrin:

lol! that is exactly what i was thinking. :biggrin:

this had made me think about other things that could possibly be donated as well. i don't know if they are allowed to take meat, but i'm thinking of raising some meat birds to donate if they will take them. i'm going to get ahold of my local donations contact and ask. and of course, they can always you monetary donations or volunteer work in the kitchens, too, so if you can't help by growing but want to help in some other way, contact them and see what they say.

Jason
05-04-2006, 07:31 PM
Ummm, can I be excused from the planting? I live in the city and the only things planted around here are telephone poles, fire hydrants and street signs. The ground is not to lively either, it's kind black and hard, pavement they call it.
:biggrin:

onesuiteworld
05-04-2006, 07:32 PM
Ummm, can I be excused from the planting? I live in the city and the only things planted around here are telephone poles, fire hydrants and street signs. The ground is not to lively either, it's kind black and hard, pavement they call it.
:biggrin:

ditto

John
05-04-2006, 07:32 PM
Ummm, can I be excused from the planting? I live in the city and the only things planted around here are telephone poles, fire hydrants and street signs. The ground is not to lively either, it's kind black and hard, pavement they call it.
:biggrin:

:lol: Two words: soup kitchens.

Thanks for the info, Carrie. I'll see what I can do. Maybe I can get them some publicity or something in the school paper.

wired
05-04-2006, 07:43 PM
We need more Carries in this world.

i think that is, quite possibly, one of the sweetest things that i've had said to me. really, i just treat others like i hope to be treated. :)

wired
05-04-2006, 07:44 PM
Ummm, can I be excused from the planting? I live in the city and the only things planted around here are telephone poles, fire hydrants and street signs. The ground is not to lively either, it's kind black and hard, pavement they call it.
:biggrin:

:lol: see post #4. :)

onesuiteworld
05-04-2006, 08:36 PM
i think that is, quite possibly, one of the sweetest things that i've had said to me. really, i just treat others like i hope to be treated. :)

hehe:biggrin:

djurzi
05-05-2006, 05:43 AM
Wow. Thanks for posting this Carrie.. I don't have a farm, but I think I will get in on this. I have heard of this, but never really knew much about it. *fingers crossed* hopefully I have a decent garden this year.. some years are better than others.