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onesuiteworld
04-26-2006, 05:17 PM
this is appalling. theyre coming to my school. they are also going to confiscate cell phones and MP3 players like iPods. its riduculous. it is the equivelent of the senate appropriations bill where senators tack on whatever they want in the fine print.

In a further erosion of democratic rights in New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that after April 24, School Safety Agents and police officers will perform random searches with metal detectors of students attending the city’s middle and high schools. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the searches might affect as many as 10 schools a day, noting that the Police Department already had the necessary material and personnel. The president of the United Federation of Teachers, Randi Weingarten, praised the policy as a “very important first step” and called for the “enforcing of codes of conduct.”

you can read the rest here (http://www.wsws.org/articles/2006/apr2006/nyci-a19.shtml)

there are so many things wrong here. im in the process, (with carrie's generous help) of writing an editorial for my paper.

John
04-26-2006, 06:35 PM
I can understand why they're doing it, but I definitely don't like the message it sends to kids: in school, you're guilty until proven innocent. I've read about similar things elsewhere, like random drug testing for all students (at my high school they brought in drug-sniffing dogs without warning), having to pass a sobriety test to get into prom, etc.

Kids bringing weapons to school is a problem, but it sure seems like metal detectors will be a band-aid solution at best.

onesuiteworld
04-26-2006, 06:46 PM
I definitely don't like the message it sends to kids: in school, you're guilty until proven innocent.

if its ok with you, im going to use thathttp://weeklydavespeak.com/forums/images/smilies/boings.gif

Alice
04-26-2006, 06:56 PM
i didn't read the entire article, just what you posted....but when i was in high school (96-00) we had to pass through metal detectors occasionally (right after columbine sticks out in my mind), couldn't have cell phones and if ipods had been out back then i'm sure we wouldn't have been able to have those either. dogs would be brought in for drug searches - in addition to sniffing (the outside) of lockers, they would sometimes come into the classroom to sniff bags.

they way i see it, you're at school to learn, not talk on a cell phone or listen to an ipod. wouldn't you feel safer knowing people have to walk through metal detectors?

John
04-26-2006, 06:59 PM
if its ok with you, im going to use thathttp://weeklydavespeak.com/forums/images/smilies/boings.gif

:lol: Yeah, that's fine. Just make sure you quote me. That's Mr. Number41Guy.

Just kidding, but yeah, use it. I'm not the first to think that/say that, I'm sure.

they way i see it, you're at school to learn, not talk on a cell phone or listen to an ipod. wouldn't you feel safer knowing people have to walk through metal detectors?


I agree with you, but at some point it becomes eerily prison-like. It kinda changes the feel of being there, you know?

onesuiteworld
04-26-2006, 07:01 PM
they way i see it, you're at school to learn, not talk on a cell phone or listen to an ipod. they way i see it, you're at school to learn, not talk on a cell phone or listen to an ipod. wouldn't you feel safer knowing people have to walk through metal detectors?


well, heres the thing. most of the time, i do not go straight home. i live far from school. therefore, i need my cell phone to get in touch with my parents, or even, sometimes, my friends. it has become a necessity of life. i never use it in school, and never plan to. but the fact that i cant bring it to use after school is absurd.

plus, if i wanted to bring a gun to my school, i could bring a gun to my school. there are 4 unguarded entrances on the side, one set of trailers that has a low low fence, and another that anyone could open the door for (this is where people go to smoke because there is not security presence). knowing this, i would not feel good about walking through metal detectors.

wired
04-26-2006, 07:47 PM
oh my god. some of those things just make me shudder. of course, i was out of highschool while many of you were learning to walk and talk (or even born in some cases, lol), but the idea that kids are being treated no better than prisoners by being subjected to random drug testing, etc. etc. really really bothers me on many levels.

are college students being subjected to the same types of invasion of privacy, or is this just something reserved for minors?

onesuiteworld
04-26-2006, 07:48 PM
are college students being subjected to the same types of invasion of privacy, or is this just something reserved for minors?

i go into the city--marrymount college--for this thing i do. security is pretty lapsed. i guess its just us hoodlums...

wired
04-26-2006, 08:00 PM
i'd like to hear from more college students... i just can't tell you how appalled i am at this.

certainly there is nothing to fear but fear itself. it is how this country bought into the mess we now have... fear. and what it says about the value we place on the younger people of our country... i just. i really am speechless.

i'm so glad my kids won't ever have to have their civil liberties stripped in the name of "education."

Charles
04-26-2006, 08:01 PM
I agrea with what they are doing but I disagrea at the message they are sending in the article. I graduated in 00 and I recently went back to school and visited a teacher and I could not beleive how many kids were talking on cell phones in the hall during classes. and in the class I went into there was 2 kids that got phone calls during class.

I wouldnt complain about having security issues, but im sure if you need to have that cell phone for reasons out of school like you said Matt then im sure the office will have something that will hold onto it for ya.

he who rocks
04-26-2006, 08:07 PM
we had threats of this througought midle school (columbine time) but never any other time, its so ******ed, me and a few friends were going to show the school people how easy it would still be to get a gun in even with metal detectors (not with a real gun of course). its so dumb, when people have there mind set on doing something, they do it. metal detectors wont fix anything, and im currently aware of the cell phone problems, but banning them wont help...

and alice you are such a nerd <3

wired
04-26-2006, 08:08 PM
you know, i asked matt something along the same lines, charles. what is the problem with just having a 'use it you lose it' kind of policy? back in my day there weren't cell phones (rotflmao that i can say that) but there was always something... walkmans, etc. if you were caught with them out during non-sanctioned times, you lost it. making a phones off policy seems like it would be sufficient. i just can't imagine kids have changed *that* much in the 18 years since i was in school. (can i *really* say that?????)

John
04-26-2006, 08:47 PM
My college campus is wide open. People come through all the time and just look around, and nobody notices. I think metal detectors and drug-sniffing dogs are mostly a high school thing.

My advice to the administrators here is to be careful how far they take this. (The guy in the article called this a "very important first step.") When you get more elaborate, you send the message that you EXPECT kids to bring weapons to school, which is scary all by itself. When you place that stereotype on the kids, they're going to develop similarly negative stereotypes about the administrators. The end result? Nobody trusts anybody, and things are worse than when they started.

Besides, the whole weapons thing -- and I think this is about weapons not cell phones lol -- is just a symptom, not the problem. We should be worried about how all these kids are getting hold of weapons so easily in the first place. And what makes them so angry/stupid they would want to bring them to school?

But, all in all, let's hope they plan to address those questions in the long-term. Maybe metal detectors are just short term?

djurzi
04-27-2006, 05:08 AM
you know, i asked matt something along the same lines, charles. what is the problem with just having a 'use it you lose it' kind of policy? back in my day there weren't cell phones (rotflmao that i can say that) but there was always something... walkmans, etc. if you were caught with them out during non-sanctioned times, you lost it. making a phones off policy seems like it would be sufficient. i just can't imagine kids have changed *that* much in the 18 years since i was in school. (can i *really* say that?????)

That is pretty much how things worked when I was going to school. If you got caught with something you shouldn't have it got taken away and "most" of the time you got it back at the end of the day.

blynn03
04-27-2006, 11:26 AM
they way i see it, you're at school to learn, not talk on a cell phone or listen to an ipod. wouldn't you feel safer knowing people have to walk through metal detectors?

I agree....we were never allowed to have any of those things either, and we all made it through the day just fine. I think its rediculous for students to think they need their iPod at school. There are better and more important things to do...


well, heres the thing. most of the time, i do not go straight home. i live far from school. therefore, i need my cell phone to get in touch with my parents, or even, sometimes, my friends. it has become a necessity of life. i never use it in school, and never plan to. but the fact that i cant bring it to use after school is absurd.

You could leave it in your car...but I'm guessing you may not drive to school. I do think its absurd for you not even to be able to have them with you. I could see taking it from someone if it was continually ringing....but if they find someone who has one with them but turned off or turned on silent, they shouldn't be allowed to take it then.


are college students being subjected to the same types of invasion of privacy, or is this just something reserved for minors?

I'm not subjected to anything like this at college. The professors will tell you to keep your phones off or silent, but they wouldn't ever take one from you (I doubt they have the power to). There are no university-wide regulations regarding cell phones though, or MP3 players for that matter. I see people listening to MP3 players b/w classes all the time, and I use my cell phone between classes a lot.

John
04-27-2006, 01:09 PM
Am I the only one who thinks this has very little to do with cell phones and iPods?

Alice
04-27-2006, 02:40 PM
Am I the only one who thinks this has very little to do with cell phones and iPods?

i think it's got to do with student's safety. things like random drug tests are def. overboard, but having to walk through a metal detector isn't. we walk through metal detectors when you go through the airport (in fact i had to take my shoes off at bwi and the las vegas airport last week) or into some sporting events and concerts, so why not a school?

*edit* this was post #4000 for me....

onesuiteworld
04-27-2006, 04:20 PM
I recently went back to school and visited a teacher and I could not beleive how many kids were talking on cell phones in the hall during classes. and in the class I went into there was 2 kids that got phone calls during class.

then im sure the office will have something that will hold onto it for ya.

well, first of all, cell phones used in school can be taken away. i have no problem with this policy. and yes, the office will hold it for you. the deams office, and you wont get it back until a parent comes. a parent!



Besides, the whole weapons thing -- and I think this is about weapons not cell phones lol -- is just a symptom, not the problem. We should be worried about how all these kids are getting hold of weapons so easily in the first place. And what makes them so angry/stupid they would want to bring them to school?


think of it like the senate appropriations bill--the cell phone issue is being tacked onto another (unneeded) issue. and i was actually considering on one of the days, bringing a blade in, once i get in through one of the 5 places i could without being scanned, and dropping it on the principals desk. that would be amazing.



You could leave it in your car




ahahhahahaha. i dont have a car, i have a metrocard which allows me onto the bus. but the thing is, i would like to have it after school, and this policy is not allowing me this.

Am I the only one who thinks this has very little to do with cell phones and iPods?

its not wrong to assume this, but the issue is over cell phones. there is NO REASON for them to be completly banned from school, because in many cases, they are needed. much like how the loss of the internet would cripple business, loss of a cell phone would completly lose the connection between parent and child.

i think it's got to do with student's safety. things like random drug tests are def. overboard, but having to walk through a metal detector isn't. we walk through metal detectors when you go through the airport (in fact i had to take my shoes off at bwi and the las vegas airport last week) or into some sporting events and concerts, so why not a school?

*edit* this was post #4000 for me....


i am SOOOOOO glad that you asked this. here is the difference. in places like airports or sports arenas, you have agreed to go there, willingly, and as a result, you have agreed to be searched. students, however, are legally mandated to attend school. therefore, this is a forced invasion of privacy, and a forced confiscation. end of discussion.

he who rocks
04-27-2006, 04:23 PM
word...

onesuiteworld
04-27-2006, 04:34 PM
so ive just gotton word that they are coming to my school tomorow. already, hundreds of cell phones, ipods, etc, have been confiscated. this will not stand. already, weve begun organizing support for protests.

onesuiteworld
04-27-2006, 04:35 PM
i do need help though. if anyone can, please send me any old cell phones. i know i hvae 2 that are dead. if anyone would like to contribute, please, send me a pm and ill give you an address you can send them too. this is really important. thanks everyone.

JohnLee41
04-27-2006, 06:09 PM
Yeah it sounds all alittle extreme to me, but I guess it depends on the neighborhood or something. Here in San Francisco, that would just be silly. I mean everyone is a doll here.

Personally, I'd walk through the metal detectors and purposly put something metal in my pants just for the hope of getting fealt up by a hot male cop.

Jason
04-27-2006, 06:42 PM
Yeah it sounds all alittle extreme to me, but I guess it depends on the neighborhood or something. Here in San Francisco, that would just be silly. I mean everyone is a doll here.

Personally, I'd walk through the metal detectors and purposly put something metal in my pants just for the hope of getting fealt up by a hot male cop.
:confused: :confused: :confused:
W ->T ->F

onesuiteworld
04-27-2006, 07:33 PM
oh man. tomorow is going to be crazy. there are going to be so many people protesting, its crazy. im helping plan stuff now. its war

wired
04-27-2006, 07:34 PM
:confused: :confused: :confused:
W ->T ->F

jason, be nice....

Alice
04-28-2006, 02:05 PM
so how did the protest go? did it actually work? :)

onesuiteworld
04-28-2006, 02:24 PM
so how did the protest go? did it actually work? :)

it didnt happen, the metal detectors never came. they went elsewhere in the area. they will come eventually though.

he who rocks
04-28-2006, 02:33 PM
o.m.g

Alice
04-28-2006, 03:14 PM
it didnt happen, the metal detectors never came. they went elsewhere in the area. they will come eventually though.

do you know if the students at the other schools protested or anything?

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 08:54 AM
do you know if the students at the other schools protested or anything?

well, in park slope (brooklyn) they rioted. several students were arrested.

at a high school (less than a mile from my school) a student was arrested for refusing to give up their cell phone. a teacher who criticized the arresting officer was arrested. a teacher criticizing that was also arrested.

elsewhere, there have been small, peaceful protests, but nothing has done much. yet.

Alice
04-29-2006, 10:59 AM
at a high school (less than a mile from my school) a student was arrested for refusing to give up their cell phone. a teacher who criticized the arresting officer was arrested. a teacher criticizing that was also arrested.

not giving up a phone just doesn't seem like something to get arrested over. the student was told they couldn't have the phone so they should have left it at home. if it was a situation where the student just HAD to have the phone, the student and the parents should have contacted the school administration to work something out.

nanciestripping
04-29-2006, 11:52 AM
this sounds so rediculous


it is perfectly acceptable to be searched going into school, the fact that its mandated doesn't mean anything - for that reason there should be MORE safety. since kids HAVE to go to school then we HAVE to make sure its safe

the cell phone thing is understandable - but still its the rule and until it gets changed you can't just decide to break it and expect them to be ok with that (the arrests of the teachers was kind of nuts) i'm curious though - how far do you live from your schoo?! if you have a metro card can't you just go home afterschool drop off your stuff and pick up your phone?

i think they should let you have your phones off in school - but we all know that people will have them on and leave on the ringers. i'm also curious to know if there have been problems with bomb threats and other uses of cell phones while in school - it seems like part of the story is missing

and to go back to college - there is nothing like this at college, my friends listen to their MP3 players IN class and cell phones ring at least in one class a day

-brad

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 12:31 PM
not giving up a phone just doesn't seem like something to get arrested over. the student was told they couldn't have the phone so they should have left it at home. if it was a situation where the student just HAD to have the phone, the student and the parents should have contacted the school administration to work something out.

its zero tolerance. a parent's phone call wouldnt do anything

this sounds so rediculous


it is perfectly acceptable to be searched going into school, the fact that its mandated doesn't mean anything - for that reason there should be MORE safety. since kids HAVE to go to school then we HAVE to make sure its safe

i have no problem with them searching and confiscating weapons. but only weapons.

i'm curious though - how far do you live from your schoo?! if you have a metro card can't you just go home afterschool drop off your stuff and pick up your phone?

oh, wouldnt that be nice. i could not do this because it takes me an hour by 2 buses to get home. its about 10 miles (dont get me started, the MTA is so bad)

i think they should let you have your phones off in school - but we all know that people will have them on and leave on the ringers. i'm also curious to know if there have been problems with bomb threats and other uses of cell phones while in school - it seems like part of the story is missing


so you know what? confiscate them if theyre used. but done ban them from the building. i always have mine off, and never use it except aftreschool, because it has become a necessary way for me to get in touch with my parents.

as far as the bomb threat, ive heard it used as an argument. its is completly absurd. the math department requires many classes to have this (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/61/TI-84_Plus.jpg/180px-TI-84_Plus.jpg)calculator. that is much larger than a cell phone, and could easily be equipped with a bomb

he who rocks
04-29-2006, 01:01 PM
ya know what.... get a motorola sliver.... and fabricate a slot for it in your shoe, then when the metal detector goes off say you have steel toes in your shoes for work after school...winning situation!

Alice
04-29-2006, 01:07 PM
its zero tolerance. a parent's phone call wouldnt do anything

well then the kid deserved it if it's a zero tolerance policy - (s)he should have given up the phone instead of being arrested.

instead of protesting has anyone tried to work with those "in charge" to come to some kind of an agreement? like having students check in their cell phones in the office...

ya know what.... get a motorola sliver.... and fabricate a slot for it in your shoe, then when the metal detector goes off say you have steel toes in your shoes for work after school...winning situation!

this reminds me of my work shoes (that i've never worn) they look just line tennis shoes but they are composite toe (aka steel toe) esd safe pair of timberlands....

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 01:24 PM
instead of protesting has anyone tried to work with those "in charge" to come to some kind of an agreement? like having students check in their cell phones in the office...


um, what school district is it that students can work with ranking officials in school to bypass a city-wide policy? what board of education actually cares about student's opinions?

John
04-29-2006, 01:32 PM
what board of education actually cares about student's opinions?

So what's the point of doing anything? Might as well just give up now.

I think Alice has some good advice there. If you and your friends really wanna make a change, don't just protest. Write letters, set up meetings or discussions, make phone calls. (I know that's not as fun or flashy as protesting.) I don't think protesting will solve anything all by itself, but it can be part of a bigger plan.

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 01:39 PM
So what's the point of doing anything? Might as well just give up now.

I think Alice has some good advice there. If you and your friends really wanna make a change, don't just protest. Write letters, set up meetings or discussions, make phone calls. (I know that's not as fun or flashy as protesting.) I don't think protesting will solve anything all by itself, but it can be part of a bigger plan.

nobody will listen. i am a writer for my school newspaper, and the principal wouldnt even consent for an interview! the only way this can be handeled is with dissent. maybe get some news coverage, and hope that bad publicity will get rid of this. there is no room for negotiation. i would love nothing more than to be diplomatic, but nobody would talk to me. i could never get a meeting with a high ranking official in the govt. school chancellor joel klien would be great, but nobody will listen. (joel klien once said that a student can get all their nutrition from a hamburger and fries lunch--and went on to describe how the lettuce is a vegtable, the potatos in the fries are starch, the whole milk is calcium, etc etc etc. hes a schmuck)

John
04-29-2006, 01:48 PM
I'd believe you if you said, "Nobody has listened" instead of "Nobody will listen." I mean, you have to at least try. Your principal denying an interview request should not just be the end of that.

I still don't understand how "dissent" somehow means only protest. You don't need to interview the principal to write an editorial about him/her, and you definitely don't need to meet with somebody in person to get their attention. For goodness sake, do people still write letters anymore? If everybody at all these schools wrote a letter to the state board of education, I'm sure they'd get their attention. For one thing, they'd take you more seriously. You have to explain your position, not just protest. Tell them specifically what you want to happen.

Also, is this all about cell phones? I mean, come on, really. If it is, no wonder they're not listening.

nanciestripping
04-29-2006, 02:04 PM
there are some good points there

at my school - upstate so i'm sure its completely different - I was chair of a student commitee that the school board used to select a principal, and we were always welcome to go to school board meetings - they are open to the public so show up

and remember when you protests - the only people who are going to see it are the cops and 'enforcers' who aren't going to give a damn - organize meetings, and action such as letters, phone calls, and show up at school board meetings

school board members are elected - so they'll listen if there is a real issue, especially if your parents think its important to have your cell phone (since they elected these people)

-brad

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 02:18 PM
I'd believe you if you said, "Nobody has listened" instead of "Nobody will listen." I mean, you have to at least try. Your principal denying an interview request should not just be the end of that.

I still don't understand how "dissent" somehow means only protest. You don't need to interview the principal to write an editorial about him/her, and you definitely don't need to meet with somebody in person to get their attention. For goodness sake, do people still write letters anymore? If everybody at all these schools wrote a letter to the state board of education, I'm sure they'd get their attention. For one thing, they'd take you more seriously. You have to explain your position, not just protest. Tell them specifically what you want to happen.

Also, is this all about cell phones? I mean, come on, really. If it is, no wonder they're not listening.

letters are easily ignored. protests are not. its wonderfully idealistic to think that writing letters will help. it will not. im not sure how things work elsewhere, but here, a bunch of letters from students will do little but put a strain on the sanitation worker's back who has to carry all the leters into the trash.

honestly speaking, we probably will not win this. but we will not roll over either.

and yes, i didnt need the interview to write my editorial (which ill post after it is printed). but it would have been nice to find out some backround, and ask the principal certain questions. the fact that an interview was denied is just a microcosm of the denial we would confront on every level.

he who rocks
04-29-2006, 02:26 PM
bring a gun!!! then theyll listen!!!!

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 02:27 PM
bring a gun!!! then theyll listen!!!!

yes. thats exactly the way i want to solve this.http://weeklydavespeak.com/forums/images/smilies/screwy.gif

he who rocks
04-29-2006, 02:33 PM
thats why its such a funny statement

nanciestripping
04-29-2006, 02:59 PM
letters are easily ignored. protests are not. its wonderfully idealistic to think that writing letters will help. it will not. im not sure how things work elsewhere, but here, a bunch of letters from students will do little but put a strain on the sanitation worker's back who has to carry all the leters into the trash.


thats your problem right there - minors can't vote, and to be honest perhaps the cell phone is a necesity for your, but a 15 yo whining about a cell phone in a letter is going to get thrown out

if you want to change anything - have parents! or legal guardians who can vote and, according to you, are being hurt by this new rule write letters! i'm still confused why you've not involved parents. the main argument is based on the fact that parents can't keep in touch with their children.

protests over cell phones won't get anything done and quite frankly you're not going to get much press - look at the 500 thousand anti-war protestors in NYC. its too big of a place to get attention

get parents organized and go to board meetings - the school board is ELECTED so go to their ELECTORATE!

just my opinion but i've been there before - our school went on myspace and suspended sports players for being in pictures where (on some cases) there were merely empty liquor bottles in the background and they were holding party cups (i have a lot of problems with this) but my point is that the code of conduct was re-written after this because students went to the administration and parents went to the school board.

you said you probably won't win - then dont' do it

if you're not in it to win - make a statement with a sign

BUT if you really feel like you need your phone, then do somthing that will work

-brad

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 03:07 PM
thats your problem right there - minors can't vote, and to be honest perhaps the cell phone is a necesity for your, but a 15 yo whining about a cell phone in a letter is going to get thrown out

if you want to change anything - have parents! or legal guardians who can vote and, according to you, are being hurt by this new rule write letters! i'm still confused why you've not involved parents. the main argument is based on the fact that parents can't keep in touch with their children.

protests over cell phones won't get anything done and quite frankly you're not going to get much press - look at the 500 thousand anti-war protestors in NYC. its too big of a place to get attention

get parents organized and go to board meetings - the school board is ELECTED so go to their ELECTORATE!

just my opinion but i've been there before - our school went on myspace and suspended sports players for being in pictures where (on some cases) there were merely empty liquor bottles in the background and they were holding party cups (i have a lot of problems with this) but my point is that the code of conduct was re-written after this because students went to the administration and parents went to the school board.

you said you probably won't win - then dont' do it

if you're not in it to win - make a statement with a sign

BUT if you really feel like you need your phone, then do somthing that will work

-brad


parents are plenty outraged, dont get me wrong. and some will do things. but most wont. these people have lives. they work. it is a very important issue, and because of the times we live in, the people who get elected will say that its for saftey (when i have already said it does nothing, and that i could easily get a weapon in). there is not a legislative solution.

but the 1.1 million students who attend nyc public schools are simply not happy, and anything we do productive such as write letters, will be overshadowed, because i am SURE that when they come to the bad schools, people are not going to welcome them with open arms. it has, and will get violent.

we dont need them here. nobody shoots up inner city schools. its the ones in the midwest where kids snap that it happens (no joke, thats where, statistically, it happens). my school is very safe, considering the racial makeup and size.

parents could help this, but the majority of them will not take enough action because its not their top priority, their top priority is keeping the job they have. but it is our (the student's) top priority, and we will not stand for it. and if it takes a walk out, i know many, many students who will walk.

nanciestripping
04-29-2006, 03:20 PM
good luck with the walk-out

you can get yourself into a lot of shit with somthing like that

but i think you need to propose solutions and fixes and try to contact these people, attend board meetings and such

at least if you TRY to find a fix, then when you do walk-out or protest and if somone interviews you - you're more likely to get good press "we've gone to board meetings, signed petitions, and proposed solutions to the problems yet we're still getting stone-walled, we didn't want it to come to this but they've left us no other choice"

thats a lot better than, "we're walking out bc they took our cell phones, its not fair"

-brad

onesuiteworld
04-29-2006, 03:23 PM
good luck with the walk-out

you can get yourself into a lot of shit with somthing like that

but i think you need to propose solutions and fixes and try to contact these people, attend board meetings and such

at least if you TRY to find a fix, then when you do walk-out or protest and if somone interviews you - you're more likely to get good press "we've gone to board meetings, signed petitions, and proposed solutions to the problems yet we're still getting stone-walled, we didn't want it to come to this but they've left us no other choice"

thats a lot better than, "we're walking out bc they took our cell phones, its not fair"

-brad

how about "weve signed petitions, published our views, showed that we are not against the metal detectors but only the confiscation policy, and still nothing".

its alot harder for teenage students when it comes to the BOE here that you might think. im not even sure if were allowed to attend board meetings

nanciestripping
04-29-2006, 08:28 PM
how about "weve signed petitions, published our views, showed that we are not against the metal detectors but only the confiscation policy, and still nothing".

its alot harder for teenage students when it comes to the BOE here that you might think. im not even sure if were allowed to attend board meetings

you're definatly allowed to

they are public meetings - open to the public - you're the public

i'm just saying look into it and try to contact these people instead of saying they won't listen say they didn't

-brad

he who rocks
04-30-2006, 01:59 PM
i kinda like the hamburger thing, i mean, all the nutrition is totally there, it works with pizza too, you get a bread, vegetable, meat, dairy, sometimes even fruit if your haveing a hawaiin pizza (or consider tomato a fruit) and sometimes there are those dessert pizzas just in case you didnt get enough sugar...

jk..

onesuiteworld
04-30-2006, 02:35 PM
jk..

phew.

onesuiteworld
05-25-2006, 06:43 PM
im ressurecting this thread for a minute--i wrote an editorial for the newspaper which is going to be distributed tomorow that i thought i'd share. let me know what you think:

(p.s. thanks to carrie for her help:))

The People’s Republic of Cardozo


The Supreme Court of the United States of America maintains that "freedom of speech doesn't end at the schoolhouse door". It has become strikingly apparent that other freedoms do. Beginning at the end of this month, metal detectors will be randomly implemented in NYC schools.
In a memo to all of Cardozo, Principal Rick Hallman assures Cardozo that “We are committed to provide a safe, secure learning environment for all students”. While honorable in his intentions, it goes on to show a main motive behind the plan that will be implemented in an average of 10 schools a day. “These [banned items] include blades, knives, other sharp metal instruments, cell phones, beepers, iPods, MP3 players, etc.” Yes, avid Verdict reader, cell phones and iPods have just been put in the same category, and been called as severe a problem as blades, knives, and other sharp metal instruments. If at this point your mind is trying to comprehend this, take a minute. This reporter needed a few.
It is no secret that cell phone and MP3 player usage within the school building is not allowed. It may be news to learn that these devices, even when turned off and safely stowed away in a backpack, are not allowed to pass through the doors of Cardozo. “Students who bring these items to school are subject to disciplinary measures.” I defy you to find more than a handful of Cardozo students who are not, on a daily basis, in possession of one or more of these banned items. Advil made the list.
High ranking officials obviously feel that cell phones create a clear and present danger in schools. Why is this? Are we afraid that a student will equip himself with a cell phone bomb? This scenario was raised to me by a few high ranking educators in Cardozo. I guess that with metal detectors, we will also have to have students take off their shoes on a daily basis, as to avoid any shoe bombs. Cell phones have become a necessity for today’s youth. In most cases, the primary function of a cell phone is to call one’s parents, be it after school so that a mother can rest safely knowing that their son or daughter is safe, or in times of emergency when a student may not be in school. Let us also not forget Columbine-the situation that brought about the extreme changes in school policy. Was it not the work of students with handy cell phones who first notified police of the shootings? And was it not these same students that helped the police find the exact location of the shooters before they could take more lives?
“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated.” The social studies department teaches the fourth amendment, but in the same school, only three floors below, the fourth amendment will be violated on a daily basis. In many social venues, such as airports, sporting events, and museums, metal detectors have been installed. In each of these places, the public has agreed to a social contract to go to this place. Teenagers, however, are mandated by law to attend school. So students will have no choice but to be searched. Bags will be scanned, and a student’s personal property will be unjustly searched.
In addition to these freedoms under siege, there is a practical situation: Cardozo is not a small school: it houses upwards of 4400 students, each using the same entrance in the morning. The congestion caused by the necessity for every student to go through a metal detector, wait for a bag to be scanned, and the eventuality of a student removing any metal he or she may have on their person will cause a fate worse than the 42nd street we already have.
"He who sacrifices freedom for security deserves neither" Benjamin Franklin, one of this country’s founding fathers, said this. Any statistic will show you that the crime rate in schools has gone down, yet drastic measures are being taken to crack down on, of all things, cell phones. It is true: school violence is a problem, and while inner city schools have not had the mass slayings that the Midwest has had, we are not without our share of problems. But this is not the way to solve them. So welcome to Cardozo: you’re guilty until proven innocent.