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MikeyCarson
11-01-2005, 08:04 AM
This is not news....but it will give me info....so I'll post this here!

I saw someone buying Organic Milk the other day (never paid it much mind before) but it got me thinking...in order for the milk to be certified organic...wouldn't the cow the milk came from also need to be organic? In other words...not only would the milk need to be chem. free etc. but the cow itself could not have been injected with anything as well as the food the cow ate....is it that indepth? Or am I reading too much into it based on what I think I know about the "organic process" :confused:

wired
11-01-2005, 09:19 PM
yup. that is pretty much how it works. :)

tiglet26
11-01-2005, 10:01 PM
some vegans even try to find out where the cow which the milk came from grazed at and whether or not the grass had natural or chemical fertilizers!

MikeyCarson
11-02-2005, 08:18 PM
Now does the parents of the cow matter? Had the parents not grazed in a Organic pasture but their calf did is that cow ok for it's milk to be organic or would they have to wait a generation because the calfs mother gave birth to it while eating non-organic food...thus in utero the calf had "impure" food

(this sounds so rediculous but I truely am interested)

wired
11-02-2005, 08:49 PM
From Stonyfield Farm's webpage:

What makes an organic cow organic?

In order for a farm to become USDA Certified Organic, the land where the cows graze must not be treated with any prohibited materials (such as persistent, toxic pesticides and chemical fertilizers) for three years. The cows must be fed a minimum of 80 percent organic feed for nine months, and 100 percent organic feed for the final three months. They also cannot be treated with antibiotics or synthetic growth hormones for a full year prior to certification.

Of course, Organic certification standards have been in flux in recent years as legislators have tried to water down and relax standards, making it easier for large producers to get in on the game (oh surprise surprise! is anything ever done in the interest of public good???). I don't follow it too terribly closely, so I don't know the current status, but this at least gives you an idea of what the grassroots organic farmers are going by. I don't really trust the "organic" stuff put out by the large producers.

MikeyCarson
11-02-2005, 08:52 PM
WOW...thanks for that!

wired
11-02-2005, 08:59 PM
Here are a couple of links that go into really good detail the certification process for different livestock products:

http://www.certifiedorganic.bc.ca/rcbtoa/training/livestock.htm
http://www.organicmilk.org/transitioning.html

We raise our own cattle for slaughter and we do it organically, though we are not certified (don't have to be - we don't sell it). They are primarily grass-fed. In the 5 years we have done it, we have only had to treat 1 cow with antibiotics (eye infections can kill them - something I did not know before this). We don't have a dairy cow and don't plan to, though I plan on raising dairy goats as soon as we can get our fencing worked out. I understand how challenging it can be to small-scale farm in a sustainable manner and I urge everyone to support your local agriculture. It is one way we can make a difference in so many ways.

thebestofwhatsaround77
11-24-2005, 06:33 PM
yeah we're big on organics up here....or at least in my household....:thumbsup:
speaking of milk, we get "the organic cow of vermont"
what a name, huh?:lol:

theponderousman
11-24-2005, 08:47 PM
yeah we're big on organics up here....or at least in my household....:thumbsup:
speaking of milk, we get "the organic cow of vermont"
what a name, huh?:lol:

Damn, that's 1 long-milk-giving cow! For the state of Vermont to have just ONE organic cow....THE organic cow....that should be on the state coin :biggrin:

thebestofwhatsaround77
11-25-2005, 07:26 AM
yeah it'd have a picture of a cow all bloated and with a look on it's face like it wants to die....getting it's udders squeezed to the point where they're covered with rashes....UGH!

theponderousman
11-25-2005, 08:39 AM
yeah it'd have a picture of a cow all bloated and with a look on it's face like it wants to die....getting it's udders squeezed to the point where they're covered with rashes....UGH!

Heh heh, thanks for the early morning laugh :lol: