PDA

View Full Version : Save NPR and PBS !


spoonInspoon
06-16-2005, 10:03 PM
The Powers that be are trying to control the Media in every possible way!.

Please read and pass this around

Sign the petition telling Congress to save NPR and PBS:

http://www.moveon.org/publicbroadcasting/ (http://www.moveon.org/publicbroadcasting/)

A House panel has voted to eliminate all funding for NPR and PBS, starting with "Sesame Street," "Reading Rainbow," and other commercial-free children's shows. If approved, this would be the most severe cut in the history of public broadcasting, threatening to pull the plug on Big Bird, Cookie Monster, and Oscar the Grouch.

The cuts would slash 25% of the federal funding this year—$100 million—and end funding altogether within two years. The loss could kill beloved children's shows like "Clifford the Big Red Dog," "Arthur," and "Postcards from Buster." Rural stations and those serving low-income communities might not survive. Other stations would have to increase corporate sponsorships.

If we can reach 250,000 signatures by the end of the week, we'll put Congress on notice.

http://www.moveon.org/publicbroadcasting/ (http://www.moveon.org/publicbroadcasting/)

Thanks!

P.S. Read the Washington Post report on the threat to NPR and PBS at:


Public Broadcasting Targeted By House
Panel Seeks to End CPB's Funding Within 2 Years

By Paul Farhi
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, June 10, 2005; Page A01

A House subcommittee voted yesterday to sharply reduce the federal government's financial support for public broadcasting, including eliminating taxpayer funds that help underwrite such popular children's educational programs as "Sesame Street," "Reading Rainbow," "Arthur" and "Postcards From Buster."

In addition, the subcommittee acted to eliminate within two years all federal money for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting -- which passes federal funds to public broadcasters -- starting with a 25 percent reduction in CPB's budget for next year, from $400 million to $300 million.

In all, the cuts would represent the most drastic cutback of public broadcasting since Congress created the nonprofit CPB in 1967. The CPB funds are particularly important for small TV and radio stations and account for about 15 percent of the public broadcasting industry's total revenue.

Expressing alarm, public broadcasters and their supporters in Congress interpreted the move as an escalation of a Republican-led campaign against a perceived liberal bias in their programming. That effort was initiated by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's own chairman, Kenneth Y. Tomlinson.

"Americans overwhelmingly see public broadcasting as an unbiased information source," Rep. David Obey (Wis.), the ranking Democrat on the subcommittee, said in a statement. "Perhaps that's what the GOP finds so offensive about it. Republican leaders are trying to bring every facet of the federal government under their control. . . . Now they are trying to put their ideological stamp on public broadcasting."

But the Republican chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on labor, health and human services, and education asserted that the panel was simply making choices among various worthy government programs, and that no political message was intended.

The subcommittee's action, which came on a voice vote, doesn't necessarily put Big Bird on the Endangered Species List. House members could restore funding as the appropriations bill moves along or, more likely, when the House and Senate meet to reconcile budget legislation later this year. The Senate has traditionally been a stronger ally of public broadcasting than the House, whose former speaker, Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), waged a high-profile but ultimately unsuccessful campaign to "zero out" funding for the CPB a decade ago.

The cuts nevertheless surprised people in public broadcasting. In his budget sent to Congress in February, President Bush had recommended reducing CPB's budget only slightly.

Several denounced the decision by the panel, which has 10 Republicans and seven Democrats, as payback by a Republican-dominated House after years of complaints from conservatives who see liberal bias in programs carried by the Public Broadcasting Service and National Public Radio. Broadcasters noted, for example, that the 25 percent cutback in next year's CPB budget was a rollback of money that Congress had promised in 2004.

PBS, in particular, drew harsh criticism in December from the Bush administration for a "Postcards From Buster" episode in which Buster, an animated rabbit, "visited" two families in Vermont headed by lesbians. And programming on both PBS and NPR has come under fire in recent months from Tomlinson, the Republican chairman of the CPB, who has pushed for greater "balance" on the public airwaves.

A spokeswoman for NPR, Andi Sporkin, directly blamed Tomlinson for yesterday's action, saying, "We've never been sure of Mr. Tomlinson's intent but, with this news, we might be seeing his effect."

Tomlinson did not return calls seeking comment. In a statement, he said, "Obviously, we are concerned [by the cuts], and we will be joining with our colleagues in the public broadcasting community to make the case for a higher level of funding as the appropriations measure makes its way through Congress."

John Lawson, the president of the Association of Public Television Stations, a Washington-based group that lobbies for public broadcasters, called the subcommittee's action "at least malicious wounding, if not outright attempted murder, of public broadcasting in America." He added, "This action could deprive tens of millions of American children of commercial-free educational programming."

Rep. Ralph Regula (R-Ohio), the subcommittee's chairman, said the cuts had nothing to do with dissatisfaction over public radio or TV programs. "It's pretty simple," he said in an interview. "The thinking was, there's not enough money for everything. There are 'must-do,' 'need-to-do' and 'nice-to-do' programs that we have to pay for. [Public broadcasting] is somewhere between a 'need-to-do' and a 'nice-to-do.' "

The subcommittee had to decide, he said, on cutting money for public broadcasting or cutting college grants, special education, worker retraining and health care programs. "No one's out to get" public broadcasting, Regula said. "It's not punitive in any way."

In fact, none of the Republican members of the subcommittee publicly denounced public radio or TV funding at yesterday's markup. Public broadcasting drew supportive statements from Obey and Rep. Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.).

Regula suggested public stations could "make do" without federal money by getting more funding from private sources, such as contributions from corporations, foundations, and listeners and viewers.

But the loss of $23.4 million in federal funds for children's educational shows -- which PBS calls its "Ready to Learn" programs -- could mean the elimination of these programs, said an official at Alexandria-based PBS who asked not to be named because the network still hopes to regain the funding. PBS's revenue totaled $333 million in fiscal year 2004.

The Ready to Learn group includes "Sesame Street," "Dragontales," "Clifford" and "Arthur," among others.

The House measure also cuts support for a variety of smaller projects, such as a $39.6 million public TV satellite distribution network and a $39.4 million program that helps public stations update their analog TV signals to digital format.

Small public radio stations, particularly those in rural areas and those serving minority audiences, may be the most vulnerable to federal cuts because they currently operate on shoestring budgets.

"This could literally put us out of business," said Paul Stankavich, president and general manager of the Alaska Public Radio Network, an alliance of 26 stations in the state that create and share news programming. "Almost all of us are down to the bone right now. If we lost 5 or 10 percent of our budgets in one fell swoop, we could end up being just a repeater service" for national news, with no funds to produce local content.

Stankavich, who also runs a public radio and TV station in Anchorage, said public radio is "an important source of news in urban areas, but it's life-critical in rural areas," especially in far-flung parts of Alaska unserved by any other broadcast medium.

spoonInspoon
06-16-2005, 10:04 PM
You know clearchannel has got there little hands in this

MikeyCarson
06-16-2005, 10:21 PM
I get MoveOn's e-mails....why the hell didn't I get this! Thanks so much for posting this Spoon...I'm acting on this now. My kids watch PBS and there is no way I'm gonna sit by and stand for this. I won't/don't allow my kids to watch $hit cartoons...theres not a day that goes by that I'm not thankful for PBS and the programs they air. I urge all of you to get involved with this.

spoonInspoon
06-16-2005, 10:34 PM
Exactly, my son couldn't live without sesame street.

jeli41
06-16-2005, 10:43 PM
K Im not going to bother expressing here how angry I am with this....I listen to NPR all the time. I dont watch PBS anymore, but I grow up with Seasame Street, Reading Rainbow, 3-2-1 contact etc. etc. Quality programming for children.

HLShivers
06-17-2005, 06:28 AM
Hell yeah! I learned alot from Seasame Street when I was little...This is total BS! Those are important to children...Why would they want to take that away?

Dave L
06-17-2005, 07:51 AM
This legit for any skeptics (http://www.snopes.com/politics/arts/pbs.asp)

Go ahead and sign this

HLShivers
06-17-2005, 07:58 AM
I emailed/signed.....This is just wrong

purplejulied
06-17-2005, 08:23 AM
Thanks for posting this. I emailed and signed and sent it to others.

Charles
06-20-2005, 08:33 PM
emailed and signed and passed on thanks for the heads up.

MikeyCarson
06-23-2005, 10:27 PM
They Got Over 1 million to sign...but need to take it one step further:
Here's the latest:

As far as we know, this is the most Americans to ever sign a petition in a single week, and it's one of the larger petitions in recent U.S. history—over 1 million people! On Tuesday in front of the Capitol dome, we stacked box upon box of your signatures and comments—more than 60,000 pages—as members of Congress and children's advocates spoke in defense of NPR and PBS. PBS children's characters Clifford the Big Red Dog, Maya and Miguel, Leona the Lion, and lots of kids reminded Congress what's at stake.

The event was swarming with press, and the story is getting lots of great news coverage. You've helped to raise the profile of this issue and increase public pressure on Congress.

Our representatives have seen how many of us there are, but now they need to hear from us directly. Before this week's vote, can you call Rep. Holt?




Congressman Rush Holt

Phone: 202-225-5801



This is an uphill fight, so every call is critical. Tell the staffer who answers why you feel so strongly about saving NPR and PBS, and ask Rep. Holt to restore all funding to public broadcasting.

I got this in an e-mail today...it say's above..this weeks vote...It's now Friday....I don't know when the vote is/was....hopefully it's not too late!?!?! Please call. I will be.

theponderousman
06-23-2005, 11:07 PM
Yeah, it's not in danger and probably wasn't TOO much in danger....it's all a bunch of political BS but I tell you what, the Republincans that started this push have ALL been put in their place, which I'm glad about!

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8335486/

purplejulied
06-24-2005, 05:49 AM
thanks for posting this. the cuts listed are horrific.

MikeyCarson
06-24-2005, 08:21 PM
And here's the result (check out what I put in bold....interesting [or rather disheartening] to say the least):

In an unexpected move yesterday afternoon, the House of Representatives approved a measure to restore $100 million of funding for NPR, PBS and local public stations.1 Republican leaders were proposing to slash $200 million from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, but you helped stop them.

Everyone said it was impossible to reverse any of the House cuts with Republicans in control. Yesterday's Washington Post described the divide between Democrats and Republicans like this:



"[O]n Capitol Hill, it's hard to find a Republican with anything nice to say about National Public Radio or the Public Broadcasting Service. Instead, they denounce them as liberal and elitist, when they bother to talk about them at all."2

Public broadcasting shouldn't divide Republicans and Democrats. More Americans trust NPR and PBS for balanced news and children's programming than any commercial network.3 Yet many Republicans have been intent on either gagging or starving public broadcasting.

So why did 87 Republicans break with the majority of their party and vote to restore the funding? In large part, because over 1 million of you signed the petition calling on Congress to reverse course. And over 40,000 of you made phone calls to your elected representatives. There was a surge of public outrage that couldn't be ignored. This victory was possible because we were joined by Free Press, Common Cause and strong allies in the House—Representatives Markey, Obey, Lowey, Dingell, Hinchey, Watson, Schakowsky, Blumenauer, Eshoo, Slaughter, and Leach, a brave Republican.

Despite this incredible progress, the House Republicans did manage to cut over $100 million, including funding for children's programming like "Sesame Street." We'll take our fight to the Senate when it considers the budget later this summer. But yesterday's vote makes it much more likely we can restore every last cent for NPR and PBS by acting together.

Yesterday also brought darker news in the fight for public broadcasting. The Republican-dominated board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) hired a former Republican National Committee chair as the next president, injecting partisanship into the very organization designed to shield public broadcasting from political meddling.4 This is only the latest effort by White House ally and CPB board chair Kenneth Tomlinson to remake public broadcasting as a partisan mouthpiece. To save NPR and PBS, we'll need to take on Tomlinson, but today we showed that the public can and will defend public broadcasting from partisan attack.

For now, we have a lot to be thankful for. Our kids can keep learning from PBS' children's programming. We can keep enjoying public broadcasting's in-depth, trustworthy news and cultural offerings. Most of all, we can be thankful for the ability of ordinary people to band together and do extraordinary things.

Thank you, for all you do,

–Noah, Joan, Marika, Wes and the MoveOn.org Team
Friday, June 24th, 2005

spoonInspoon
06-24-2005, 09:44 PM
And here's the result (check out what I put in bold....interesting [or rather disheartening] to say the least):

In an unexpected move yesterday afternoon, the House of Representatives approved a measure to restore $100 million of funding for NPR, PBS and local public stations.1 Republican leaders were proposing to slash $200 million from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, but you helped stop them.

Everyone said it was impossible to reverse any of the House cuts with Republicans in control. Yesterday's Washington Post described the divide between Democrats and Republicans like this:




"[O]n Capitol Hill, it's hard to find a Republican with anything nice to say about National Public Radio or the Public Broadcasting Service. Instead, they denounce them as liberal and elitist, when they bother to talk about them at all."2

Public broadcasting shouldn't divide Republicans and Democrats. More Americans trust NPR and PBS for balanced news and children's programming than any commercial network.3 Yet many Republicans have been intent on either gagging or starving public broadcasting.

So why did 87 Republicans break with the majority of their party and vote to restore the funding? In large part, because over 1 million of you signed the petition calling on Congress to reverse course. And over 40,000 of you made phone calls to your elected representatives. There was a surge of public outrage that couldn't be ignored. This victory was possible because we were joined by Free Press, Common Cause and strong allies in the House—Representatives Markey, Obey, Lowey, Dingell, Hinchey, Watson, Schakowsky, Blumenauer, Eshoo, Slaughter, and Leach, a brave Republican.

Despite this incredible progress, the House Republicans did manage to cut over $100 million, including funding for children's programming like "Sesame Street." We'll take our fight to the Senate when it considers the budget later this summer. But yesterday's vote makes it much more likely we can restore every last cent for NPR and PBS by acting together.

Yesterday also brought darker news in the fight for public broadcasting. The Republican-dominated board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) hired a former Republican National Committee chair as the next president, injecting partisanship into the very organization designed to shield public broadcasting from political meddling.4 This is only the latest effort by White House ally and CPB board chair Kenneth Tomlinson to remake public broadcasting as a partisan mouthpiece. To save NPR and PBS, we'll need to take on Tomlinson, but today we showed that the public can and will defend public broadcasting from partisan attack.

For now, we have a lot to be thankful for. Our kids can keep learning from PBS' children's programming. We can keep enjoying public broadcasting's in-depth, trustworthy news and cultural offerings. Most of all, we can be thankful for the ability of ordinary people to band together and do extraordinary things.

Thank you, for all you do,

–Noah, Joan, Marika, Wes and the MoveOn.org Team
Friday, June 24th, 2005

Got the same e-mail today! good work yall

MikeyCarson
06-25-2005, 10:28 PM
Last one kids...got this one today:
First posted contact Rush Holt not realizing (in the heat of war) that he is Congressman for my area and not yours (DUH!)...anyway here was a e-mail responce I got from him/his people/automatic responce..whoever!

Dear Damian,
Public Broadcasting Protected

Over the last few days, I have received hundreds of emails and phone calls in support of funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which helps fund PBS, NPR, and their local affiliates. Like many of my constituents, I am a regular listener and viewer of public broadcasting, and find these locally-controlled stations and their programming to be educational, informative, and valuable. That is why I am so pleased to have been part of a national movement to save public broadcasting from huge budget cuts.

I was extremely disappointed when, last week, the House Appropriations Committee decided to eliminate $220 million (25%) of previously appropriated funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Yesterday, however, I was proud to support an amendment to the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill to restore this funding. The amendment passed by a wide margin (284-140), no doubt in large part to the voices expressed across the country in support of programs like Sesame Street, Charlie Rose, the Diane Rehm Show, and many more.

To read remarks that I delivered on the House floor, click here (http://holt.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm?mailaction=clickthru&gpiv=1999997299.20590.324&gen=1&mailing_linkid=2685).

Investing in Small Business

Small businesses are the engine of this nation's economic growth. According to the House Small Business Committee, they account for half of our domestic product and three-fourths of new jobs created each year. Unfortunately, many small businesses have been struggling against rising health care costs and a sluggish economy. That is why I have cosponsored legislation (http://holt.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm?mailaction=clickthru&gpiv=1999997299.20590.324&gen=1&mailing_linkid=2689)to provide small businesses with a tax credit for 50% of their healthcare costs. More needs to be done, however. It is vitally important that the federal government provide small businesses access to low-interest loans for expansion and investment in equipment, facilities, and workforce.

I have been a strong supporter of the Small Business Administration (http://holt.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm?mailaction=clickthru&gpiv=1999997299.20590.324&gen=1&mailing_linkid=2687) 7(a) loan program, which helps companies invest in the resources they need to be successful. 7(a) loans are the most widely used of the federal government's loan programs, and are particularly valuable because they provide small sums at minimal risk. This is especially important for the growing high-technology and R&D communities, which are working to make Central New Jersey "Einstein's Alley," a world leader in research and development (R&D).

To read my Congressional Record statement on the Small Business Administration 7(a) loans, please click here (http://holt.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm?mailaction=clickthru&gpiv=1999997299.20590.324&gen=1&mailing_linkid=2686).

Combating Anti-Semitism

Sixty years after the end of the Second World War, one of its most notorious legacies – anti-Semitism – has yet to be eradicated. I recently joined the newly-created Congressional Task Force Against Anti-Semitism, co-chaired by Rep. Tom Lantos (D-CA) (http://holt.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm?mailaction=clickthru&gpiv=1999997299.20590.324&gen=1&mailing_linkid=2688), a Holocaust survivor. The purpose of the task force is to monitor and coordinate congressional action against bigotry, racism, discrimination, and anti-Semitism. There has been a resurgence of anti-Semitism in Europe, and vestiges of it in the U.S. still exist today. Lawmakers need such a forum for a continuing dialogue about anti-Semitism, and for determining what we can do to fight it. At its first meeting, the Task Force heard from Ambassador Edward O'Donnell, Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues regarding the recent OSCE Anti-Semitism Conference, which took place in Cordoba, Spain earlier this month. To read about the conference, click here (http://holt.congressnewsletter.net/mail/util.cfm?mailaction=clickthru&gpiv=1999997299.20590.324&gen=1&mailing_linkid=2692).

Sincerely,

RUSH HOLT

purplejulied
06-28-2005, 11:53 PM
Yeah, it's not in danger and probably wasn't TOO much in danger....it's all a bunch of political BS but I tell you what, the Republincans that started this push have ALL been put in their place, which I'm glad about!

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8335486/


It's awesome. The letter you got back is really cool too.

HLShivers
06-30-2005, 06:47 AM
That's good that they've reconsidered....

purplejulied
06-30-2005, 09:55 PM
The funding is going to be less than before though.

MikeyCarson
06-30-2005, 09:57 PM
Unfortunalty you are correct...good maybe they'll shit can Barney!

purplejulied
06-30-2005, 09:57 PM
what the purple dinosaur?

MikeyCarson
06-30-2005, 10:02 PM
2 away Julie!!!! Of course the purple dinosaur...oh sorry your fav. color

JR E K
06-30-2005, 10:36 PM
Barney Was My Favorite Show!!! Dont Go Dissing Him!!!!!!!!!

spoonInspoon
07-01-2005, 01:45 AM
Yeah they cut funding BUT NPR and PBS arent going anywhere

purplejulied
07-01-2005, 01:51 AM
Barney Was My Favorite Show!!! Dont Go Dissing Him!!!!!!!!!

Yeah
I like you. You like me. We're a happy family

onesuiteworld
07-03-2005, 06:50 PM
its such bullshit, the few actual fair and balanced news...(some of you know who that was directed towards)

onesuiteworld
07-03-2005, 06:51 PM
signed it, thanx for posting it